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  1. #16
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    The broadband infrastructure isn't in the UK to support widespread streaming.

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    BT already achieve it to their customers so why not?
    VU+ Ultimo 4K 3TB, 1x Twin DVBS-2 FBC / 1x DVB-C FBC/ 1x Twin DVB-T2.
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  3. #18
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    Actually I called sky the other day to change my package and I asked about sky uhd. He said that it does come from the dish. The main box will come from the satellite dish and any additional boxes in the house comes thro the Internet

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaMacFunkin View Post
    BT already achieve it to their customers so why not?
    From what little information I can find, Sky have nearly ten times the customers that BT TV has.

  6. #20
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    They will most likely stream using the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), H.265. There system will be built for this codec.
    There is a massive reduction in the amount of bitrate needed to stream video in H.265.

    A 1080p video can be streamed without issue on 3 Mbps.
    Companies like Nvidia, Intel, Apple, GoPro and most others now have this codec incorporated into their systems/equipment.

    Currently recommendations of bitrate needed for H.264
    480p, recommended bitrate = 3 Mbps
    720p, recommended bitrate = 5 Mbps
    1080p, recommended bitrate = 8 Mbps
    3840 x 2160 ó 4K, recommended bitrate = 25 Mbps

    To give you an idea of the reduction compared to H.264
    The average bit rate reduction for HEVC was:
    52% for 480p - recommended bitrate H.265 = 1.44 Mbps
    56% for 720p - recommended bitrate H.265 = 2.2 Mbps
    62% for 1080p - recommended bitrate H.265 = 3.04 Mbps
    64% for 4K UHD - recommended bitrate H.265 = 9 Mbps

    You can read more details about the tests that was conducted by the BBC and the University of the West of Scotland to prove these results on the High Efficiency Video Coding wiki page. People who have (what they see as) a crappy 5/6 Mbps internet speed should have no issues streaming 1080p with the H.265 codec.

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  8. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by thisntaht View Post
    They will most likely stream using the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), H.265. There system will be built for this codec.
    There is a massive reduction in the amount of bitrate needed to stream video in H.265.

    A 1080p video can be streamed without issue on 3 Mbps.
    Companies like Nvidia, Intel, Apple, GoPro and most others now have this codec incorporated into their systems/equipment.

    Currently recommendations of bitrate needed for H.264
    480p, recommended bitrate = 3 Mbps
    720p, recommended bitrate = 5 Mbps
    1080p, recommended bitrate = 8 Mbps
    3840 x 2160 — 4K, recommended bitrate = 25 Mbps

    To give you an idea of the reduction compared to H.264
    The average bit rate reduction for HEVC was:
    52% for 480p - recommended bitrate H.265 = 1.44 Mbps
    56% for 720p - recommended bitrate H.265 = 2.2 Mbps
    62% for 1080p - recommended bitrate H.265 = 3.04 Mbps
    64% for 4K UHD - recommended bitrate H.265 = 9 Mbps

    You can read more details about the tests that was conducted by the BBC and the University of the West of Scotland to prove these results on the High Efficiency Video Coding wiki page. People who have (what they see as) a crappy 5/6 Mbps internet speed should have no issues streaming 1080p with the H.265 codec.
    Are the progressive figures for 25Hz or 50Hz transmission?

    What rate is required for the other 40% of the transmission? I assume that the figure of 64% for 4K means that for 64% of content a 9Mbs data rate is adequate but what rate is required for a a scene with a lot of change of movement such as a football match where the camera pans over the watching crowd.

    The result will be that 4K will have the same quality as SD analogue TV of yesteryear. These lossy coding methods are not designed for picture quality bit to squeeze as much crap into as little of bandwidth as possible. Once information has been lost at the broadcast end of the process with lossy encoding there is nothing that can be done at the consumer end of the decoding process to restore the quality of the original information captured in the camera.

    In the UK you just have to watch some of the lesser channel to see the effects of over compression of the transmitted video where the displayed picture appears "soft" and out of focus. Even on HD watch something with a lot of movement in a scene such as the start of a marathon or on entertainment shows where they use a silver paper cannon and the picture turns to mush.
    Extrend ET10K, 2 x satellite tuners 28.2 (UK Freesat channels), 2 x hybrid (UK Freeview channels)

  9. #22
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    Doesn't 64% refer to the amount 25Mbps is reduced to give 9Mbps?

  10. #23
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    @ccs - Correct.

  11. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by adm View Post
    Are the progressive figures for 25Hz or 50Hz transmission?

    What rate is required for the other 40% of the transmission? I assume that the figure of 64% for 4K means that for 64% of content a 9Mbs data rate is adequate but what rate is required for a a scene with a lot of change of movement such as a football match where the camera pans over the watching crowd.

    The result will be that 4K will have the same quality as SD analogue TV of yesteryear. These lossy coding methods are not designed for picture quality bit to squeeze as much crap into as little of bandwidth as possible. Once information has been lost at the broadcast end of the process with lossy encoding there is nothing that can be done at the consumer end of the decoding process to restore the quality of the original information captured in the camera.

    In the UK you just have to watch some of the lesser channel to see the effects of over compression of the transmitted video where the displayed picture appears "soft" and out of focus. Even on HD watch something with a lot of movement in a scene such as the start of a marathon or on entertainment shows where they use a silver paper cannon and the picture turns to mush.
    I think you have misunderstood that explanation (I don't mean that to some patronising)
    The link below should help clarify. Scroll down to the Coding efficiency section
    HTML Code:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Efficiency_Video_Coding

  12. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by adm View Post
    The result will be that 4K will have the same quality as SD analogue TV of yesteryear. These lossy coding methods are not designed for picture quality bit to squeeze as much crap into as little of bandwidth as possible. Once information has been lost at the broadcast end of the process with lossy encoding there is nothing that can be done at the consumer end of the decoding process to restore the quality of the original information captured in the camera.
    .
    That is completely false and non factual information.
    In August, 2016, Netflix published the results of a large-scale study comparing the leading open-source HEVC encoder, x265, with the leading open-source AVC encoder, x264 and the reference VP9 encoder, libvpx. Using their advanced Video Multimethod Assessment Fusion (VMAF) video quality measurement tool, Netflix found that x265 delivered identical quality at bit rates ranging from 35.4% to 53.3% lower than x264.

    Source
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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Efficiency_Video_Coding

  13. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by thisntaht View Post
    That is completely false and non factual information.
    In August, 2016, Netflix published the results of a large-scale study comparing the leading open-source HEVC encoder, x265, with the leading open-source AVC encoder, x264 and the reference VP9 encoder, libvpx. Using their advanced Video Multimethod Assessment Fusion (VMAF) video quality measurement tool, Netflix found that x265 delivered identical quality at bit rates ranging from 35.4% to 53.3% lower than x264.

    Source
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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Efficiency_Video_Coding
    Although one has to read some of the external commentaries on the Netflix blog post to realise that as usual its a good piece of marketing - and that results may not be as good as they indicate
    As usual "they would say that wouldn't they"!!
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