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    Asus N66 discussion

    rossi2000, can this be used as a standalone router or does it need to be connected to a modem?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dfox View Post
    rossi2000, can this be used as a standalone router or does it need to be connected to a modem?
    I have this router. It is connected to my bt openreach modem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joysleep1 View Post
    I have this router. It is connected to my bt openreach modem.
    Ok so I cannot use it as a normal router, it needs to be connected to a modem

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    Quote Originally Posted by dfox View Post
    rossi2000, can this be used as a standalone router or does it need to be connected to a modem?
    It can be used as a standalone router and or a wireless access point.
    Is this thing even still for sale? It was 10 months ago lol.
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    That's good so I can use it instead of the router provided by my ISP.

    Ha ha have no idea if it is still for sale but I can only ask. If it wasn't I would of thought the thread would have been closed.

    Just had a quick look in the for sale section and noticed it.

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    But you will still need to use your router provided by you IP if it is a combined modem/router.
    With cable you would just put it into modem mode.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaMacFunkin View Post
    But you will still need to use your router provided by you IP if it is a combined modem/router.
    With cable you would just put it into modem mode.
    I have just switched from VM to EE, Just wanted to use a different router to the one EE provided.

    Can I not just swap it out for that one?

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    What's supplied by an ISP is usually a modem/router. That means that the modem part connects to the phone line (for ADSL or VDSL) or to the cable provider's feed (for Virgin/UPC or whatever) in order to extract the internet protocol data. The router part distributes the data to your home devices, either wirelessly or via CAT 5/6 cable. The device on sale (or sold) in this thread is just a standalone router with wi-fi capabilities so it is perfectly capable of connecting to and routing data to all your home devices (your LAN), but it needs another device to connect to the internet (WAN). This could be a cable modem or ADSL/VDSL modem. Either way, it will need a CAT 5 (RJ45) patch cable to connect to a modem.

    The reasons people use these standalone routers vary from needing better wifi coverage to having faster cabled LAN performance or for security reasons or whatever. In the case of your EE supplied modem/router you would put it into bridge mode and turn off all wifi and routing settings. Then you would connect the WAN port of the ASUS router into one of the EE modem LAN ports. You would also need to put your ISP user name and password into the ASUS so it can connect through the EE modem.

    The alternative is to get your own router with modem capabilities but you need to ensure that it is compatible with your ISP. In my setup I have a Vodafone supplied VDSL modem/router in bridged mode and use a TP-Link Archer C7 router to support my home LAN and wifi. Hope this makes it clearer
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    Quote Originally Posted by dfox View Post
    I have just switched from VM to EE, Just wanted to use a different router to the one EE provided.

    Can I not just swap it out for that one?
    No this is just a router, not a modem/router.

    You will need to connect it to your EE modem/router if you want internet access through it.

    If you want an asus modem/router look for something like the DSL-N66U model.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fat-tony View Post
    What's supplied by an ISP is usually a modem/router. That means that the modem part connects to the phone line (for ADSL or VDSL) or to the cable provider's feed (for Virgin/UPC or whatever) in order to extract the internet protocol data. The router part distributes the data to your home devices, either wirelessly or via CAT 5/6 cable. The device on sale (or sold) in this thread is just a standalone router with wi-fi capabilities so it is perfectly capable of connecting to and routing data to all your home devices (your LAN), but it needs another device to connect to the internet (WAN). This could be a cable modem or ADSL/VDSL modem. Either way, it will need a CAT 5 (RJ45) patch cable to connect to a modem.

    The reasons people use these standalone routers vary from needing better wifi coverage to having faster cabled LAN performance or for security reasons or whatever. In the case of your EE supplied modem/router you would put it into bridge mode and turn off all wifi and routing settings. Then you would connect the WAN port of the ASUS router into one of the EE modem LAN ports. You would also need to put your ISP user name and password into the ASUS so it can connect through the EE modem.

    The alternative is to get your own router with modem capabilities but you need to ensure that it is compatible with your ISP. In my setup I have a Vodafone supplied VDSL modem/router in bridged mode and use a TP-Link Archer C7 router to support my home LAN and wifi. Hope this makes it clearer
    Exactly what I needed to know.

    Cheers mate

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    Quote Originally Posted by kryton View Post
    No this is just a router, not a modem/router.

    You will need to connect it to your EE modem/router if you want internet access through it.

    If you want an asus modem/router look for something like the DSL-N66U model.
    Spot on cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by fat-tony View Post
    What's supplied by an ISP is usually a modem/router. That means that the modem part connects to the phone line (for ADSL or VDSL) or to the cable provider's feed (for Virgin/UPC or whatever) in order to extract the internet protocol data. The router part distributes the data to your home devices, either wirelessly or via CAT 5/6 cable. The device on sale (or sold) in this thread is just a standalone router with wi-fi capabilities so it is perfectly capable of connecting to and routing data to all your home devices (your LAN), but it needs another device to connect to the internet (WAN). This could be a cable modem or ADSL/VDSL modem. Either way, it will need a CAT 5 (RJ45) patch cable to connect to a modem.

    The reasons people use these standalone routers vary from needing better wifi coverage to having faster cabled LAN performance or for security reasons or whatever. In the case of your EE supplied modem/router you would put it into bridge mode and turn off all wifi and routing settings. Then you would connect the WAN port of the ASUS router into one of the EE modem LAN ports. You would also need to put your ISP user name and password into the ASUS so it can connect through the EE modem.

    The alternative is to get your own router with modem capabilities but you need to ensure that it is compatible with your ISP. In my setup I have a Vodafone supplied VDSL modem/router in bridged mode and use a TP-Link Archer C7 router to support my home LAN and wifi. Hope this makes it clearer
    I will probably go down the same route you have, similar setup but I may be contacting you to rack your brains as never really setup anything else on the networking side apart from supplied routers from ISP

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    ...or you could be really creative and route stuff where speed is critical through your existing router, and stuff that is mystical through your vpn router which is what i do...
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    i guess the question was answered. thanks all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fat-tony View Post
    What's supplied by an ISP is usually a modem/router. That means that the modem part connects to the phone line (for ADSL or VDSL) or to the cable provider's feed (for Virgin/UPC or whatever) in order to extract the internet protocol data. The router part distributes the data to your home devices, either wirelessly or via CAT 5/6 cable. The device on sale (or sold) in this thread is just a standalone router with wi-fi capabilities so it is perfectly capable of connecting to and routing data to all your home devices (your LAN), but it needs another device to connect to the internet (WAN). This could be a cable modem or ADSL/VDSL modem. Either way, it will need a CAT 5 (RJ45) patch cable to connect to a modem.

    The reasons people use these standalone routers vary from needing better wifi coverage to having faster cabled LAN performance or for security reasons or whatever. In the case of your EE supplied modem/router you would put it into bridge mode and turn off all wifi and routing settings. Then you would connect the WAN port of the ASUS router into one of the EE modem LAN ports. You would also need to put your ISP user name and password into the ASUS so it can connect through the EE modem.

    The alternative is to get your own router with modem capabilities but you need to ensure that it is compatible with your ISP. In my setup I have a Vodafone supplied VDSL modem/router in bridged mode and use a TP-Link Archer C7 router to support my home LAN and wifi. Hope this makes it clearer
    Just going back to your post about putting my EE supplied router in bridge mode.

    There is not an option for that when I looked but I read somewhere about putting it in fibre/ethernet mode and then turning off DHCP and wifi settings?

    Havent got another router yet but when I do I might have some questions ha ha

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